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This is What Climate Change Talks Look Like in Florida Now


You’ve probably seen the story already: employees at multiple state agencies in Florida have been banned from using the terms “climate change,” “global warming,” and “sustainability” in meetings, press conferences – basically anywhere that the public might see or hear them speak.

So what happens when you have to hold a hearing about climate change with a state employee who can’t say “climate change”? Watch the video from our friends at Forecast the Facts to find out.

The footage above is from a hearing that was, in a roundabout way, sparked by that very ban; apparently disturbed at Florida’s (and other states’) refusal to acknowledge climate change, let alone combat it, FEMA announced this week that, basically, they’re done messing around. Starting in March of 2016, any state seeking disaster preparedness funds is going to be turned down unless its governor approves hazard mitigation plans that address climate change.

This is bad news for Florida, which is in the unfortunate position of being a state that is both at higher-than-average risk when it comes to chaotic weather brought on by shifting climate conditions and led by one of the most stringent and blatant climate denying governors in the U.S. That concern is what prompted the hearing you see above, with state Sen. Jeff Clemens, D-Lake Worth, questioning a state emergency management official about how the new FEMA guidelines will impact Florida’s ability to handle hurricane preparedness and disaster relief.

The emergency management official in question seems to be pretty confident that Florida will be a-ok in the event of a massive hurricane or other forms of climate chaos, despite being at serious risk of losing preparedness funds. Let’s hope he’s right.

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